January 19, 2018: *** The local economy of Tagbilaran City was infused with almost P5-B in 2017. New business went up from 602 to 1,017 which amounts to an almost P1.2-B worth of capitalization or a 160% increase from last year, while business renewals also went up from 4231 to 4693 which posted gross receipts amounting to almost P3.4-B or a 21% from 2016. ***Gov. Edgar Chatto turns over today the P1.9-M first tranche of the P9.8-M assistance to the Bohol Dairy Producers Association for the Bohol Dairy Milk Processing and Marketing Enterprise as Bohol is poised to be the Dairy Capital of the country.

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Sunday, September 11, 2011

Cybersex punishable under child porno, foto video voyeur laws

Rey Anthony Chiu

TAGBILARAN CITY, Bohol Sept 10 (PIA) –If you think you can escape punishment for cybersex because no such law has been crafted, think again.

In the absence of specific laws against cybersex, police authorities cite two existing and applicable laws in the country that can still be used in the pursuit of this criminal activity.

During the recent Kapihan sa PIA, SPO4 Rosemarie Avenido said that since it is the state’s task to preserve the dignity and privacy of persons while guaranteeing full human rights, it has criminalized cybersex.

Speaking at the recent Kapihan sa PIA, SPO4 Avenido named the anti-Child Pornography Act of 2009 Photo and Video Voyeurism Act of 2009 as applicable laws.

Wikipedia defines cybersex as a virtual sex encounter where two or more persons connected remotely through a computer network send each other sexually explicit messages describing a sexual experiences in a form of sexual role-play as they describe actions through instant messaging of audio chat, all to stimulate sexual feelings or fantasies.

While text-based cybersex has been on for years, the webcams’ popularity has enhanced the practice of online partners or groups using two-way video connections to openly expose themselves.

In Bohol, both SPO4 Avenido Camp Dagohoy children and women desks supervisor PInspector Tomasita Cariño agree that there are cybersex sessions going on in internet-cafes and other private locations, but they refused to name them.

Cybersex dens operate by charging viewing customers at outrageous rates, Inspector Carino said.

According to sources, an hour-long session can be charged thousands of pesos, and that is true to children, teens or adults who expose and prostitute their bodies in front of a computer.

While parents have reportedly said cybersex is not prostitution because nobody touches their bodies, police authorities press that cybersex is also prostitution.
 
But a law here has criminalized photo and video voyeurism as well as child pornography, police sources said.

Republic Act 9775 has banned the hiring, persuading, coercing or inducing a child to perform in the production or creation of any form of child pornography. It also band anyone from transmitting, broadcasting, reproducing among others, any for of child pornography.

In fact, conspiracy to commit child pornography makes it syndicated and raises the penalties to life imprisonment and P2 million to 5 million fines, Avenido said.

On the other hand, photo and video voyeurism has banned the taking of videos or pictures of persons in any form of sexual act or capture the image of any private parts without express permission. The law also bans reproduction or distribution of these materials regardless of it taken with permission.

Avenido revealed that in the country, children are lured into cybersex operations to cater to wealthy pedophiles who pay sums just to view videos or photos of nude children.

Be aware where your children hang out and keep tabs on their internet habits, both Inspector Carino and SPO4 Avenido urged. (30) 

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